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Food Europe

A Guide to European Food Culture

A Guide to European Food Culture

Food cultures, Food Europe
Food and culture are very closely related to each other. Food culture includes traditions, dishes, and ingredients. The food culture in Europe differs from country to country, but there are common characteristics that distinguish European cuisines from, for example, Asian. The biggest source of starch in the kitchen is wheat flour, as well as dumplings of various kinds, pasta, and pastries. Most countries in Europe use sauces and spices as condiments and accessories. Let's look closer at the general rules and traditions of European food culture and how it varies depending on the country and which part of Europe you are in. Nordic cuisine The Finnish cuisine is reminiscent of the German, Swedish and Russian cuisines. The food culture in Norway is based primarily on the raw mater...
A Guide to French Cuisine and Dishes

A Guide to French Cuisine and Dishes

Food cultures, Food Europe
Hardly any country in the world is as famous for its food as France is. When it comes to food culture, there are very few, if any, countries that can compete with France. They are known for using as much as it can of just the finest and freshest ingredients they can come across and for their sophisticated cooking methods. The only ones who may still consider that France is not perfect when it comes to cooking may be vegetarians or vegans. It is quite unusual with vegetarians and vegans in France and therefore the supply is quite narrow. However, more and more alternatives have begun to emerge as the trend grows. If you travel through the country you will soon discover that the dishes differ a great deal between the different regions. If you want to get the most "French" food a...
A Guide to Spanish Cuisine

A Guide to Spanish Cuisine

Food cultures, Food Europe
In Spain, tapas is the most typical dish for the country. It is an ancient tasty tradition and almost all of the Spanish cuisine is like tapas. Spain is known as the land of small dishes and it is a must to eat tapas when visiting the country. On the walkway along the shops there is a large selection of tapas bars where you can pick and choose. It is common for different areas or bars to specialize in tapas. For tapas, it may be appropriate to have a beer or a glass of wine. Madrid's most dense and best tapas neighborhood is located just southwest of Plaza Mayor in the La Latina district. In the streets of Cava Alta and Cava Baja, you can eat tapas for hours. Food that Spain is famous for and that you often find in tapas is a lot of seafood and fish. There are also Iberian ham an...
A Guide to German Cuisine

A Guide to German Cuisine

Food cultures, Food Europe
Everyone knows about French cuisine, but German? It may not be easy to think of anything else but sausage but if you are going to Germany, you should not miss to enjoy their domestic delights. Here are some dishes you should try and a guide to German food culture! Germany is food, especially if you come to home cooking. The kitchen may not have the same aura as the French which is most often associated with refined arrangements in small portions, while Germany is instead dominated by large portions and rustic well-cooked home cooking. There are of course plenty of restaurants of very high class, which in Baiersbronn a place that is said to have the most Michelin restaurant stars per inhabitant. But what is typical German food then? Not easy to say since Germany is a large country...
A Guide to Irish Food Culture

A Guide to Irish Food Culture

Food cultures, Food Europe
English food culture dominates in Ireland. Everything can be breaded, and you get chips (french fries) for everything. Meat is always well done, and you get cooked vegetables for your food (carrots, haricot verts, broccoli. Instead of gravy, gravy, or bird, stuffing (bread crumbs mixed with spices) applies. There are very good ingredients produced on the island, but the Irish themselves do not use them for the most interesting dishes. Nor does the ordinary Irishman seem to have taken a liking to long-distance foreign food. Visit a butcher to buy meat when you cook, it is an element that has disappeared in many countries, as it is becoming more common with pre-cut and plastic-packed. The meat is almost always locally produced. Similarly, fish shops are also still common in Irish c...
Regional Differences in Italian Food Culture

Regional Differences in Italian Food Culture

Food cultures, Food Europe
Italian food culture has influenced large parts of the world. Italian cuisine is popular and appreciated by gourmets and critics, and often associated with fine cooking at luxury restaurants. But Italy is a long country, and the food culture is not the same across the whole of Italy. There are many regional differences from south to north, and in this post, we will go through them. Food culture in the north of Italy In northern Italy, we find that we are closer to Austria, for example. Here the food is heavier, preferably potatoes, risotto and pasta. Always bread for every meal. The climate is also colder in northern Italy, making hot dishes such as pots popular. In these, you often have different types of meat and legumes. Central Italy food culture In central Italy, eating hab...
Guide to French Food Culture

Guide to French Food Culture

Food cultures, Food Europe
French food can be very varied. Here there are both classic dishes and more modern ones, as well as simple and difficult meals to cook. Baguette, snails, cheese and wine in all honor, but the fact is that French cuisine has much more to offer, not least in the capital Paris. The classic French cuisine You've probably heard of the classic French cuisine. This is something that many chefs learn more about during their education and which kitchens in other countries have been inspired by. For the most part, classic French cuisine includes traditional dishes that are not infrequently rich in cream and sauces of various kinds. Wine is often used for this. Nouvelle cuisine is the opposite of this and means new (modern) cuisine. Haute cuisine offers satisfying and sophisticated meals ...
Guide to Italian Food Culture

Guide to Italian Food Culture

Food cultures, Food Europe
Italian food culture has a close connection to the country's different geographical regions and also historical development. Some claim that Italian cooking originated in Sicily because it was over 2000 years that the Greeks and Phoenicians introduced their food art to this island. saffron, rice, and sugar in the cooking. From Sicily, this food inspiration then spread to the Italian mainland, and olives and lemons are today some of the most widely used ingredients in Italian cuisine. During Renaissance Italy, the food culture flourished in the palatial palaces. People began to slowly but surely use local ingredients in a simple but accurate way, which still characterizes Italian cuisine today. Wine has also played an important role at times and together with France, Italy is the ...
A guide to Italian Food Culture

A guide to Italian Food Culture

Food cultures, Food Europe
The Italians are passionate about food and cooking, and it is easy to understand because Italian cuisine is based on fresh, high-quality ingredients. Therefore, there is also a big difference in the dishes you are served in the different regions of Italy. The information below is therefore generalized since it is impossible to go into depth in just one article. Therefore, to experience the unique traditions of each unique region, we urge you to test the gastronomic delights yourself on a (round) trip in the country. Breakfast in Italy The Italians do not make a big deal of breakfast, and they often settle for a cup of coffee without eating anything. In hotels, where breakfast is usually included in the price, you get something to eat, but you should not expect the biggest breakfas...
A Guide to Food in Spain

A Guide to Food in Spain

Food cultures, Food Europe
The Spaniards have a very proud food tradition. For most tourists, Spanish food is often associated with tapas, paella, and drink sangria. Sangria has basically become the national drink in addition to the very important meal wine then - of which Riojan is among the best. The famous Sherry (Jerez) from Andalusia is also a typical Spanish drink. In Spain, there are plenty of fresh and fresh ingredients that you can add to your cooking and that really characterize Spanish cuisine. Here you do not need to cook long sauces or sauces to spice up the raw materials, but you use the already amazing tasting experiences that are found directly in the raw materials. If you want to experience a really good Spanish meal, you should find a traditional local restaurant. In the holiday resorts, ...